Apple hits record $1 trillion US stock market valuation

Stock on the rise since Tuesday earnings report and news of share buyback

Image: Dado Ruvic/Illustration/Reuters

 

Apple Inc. became the first $1 trillion US publicly listed U.S. company on Thursday, crowning a decade-long rise fuelled by its ubiquitous iPhone that transformed it from a niche player in personal computers into a global powerhouse spanning entertainment and communications.

The tech company’s stock jumped 2.9 per cent to end the day at $207.39 US, giving it a market capitalization of $1.002 trillion US. During the session, Apple’s stock market value reached as much as $1.006 trillion US.

Apple has rallied about 9 per cent since Tuesday, when it reported June-quarter results above expectations and said it bought back $20 billion US of its own shares. It was Apple’s best-two-day run since April 2014.

Started in the garage of co-founder Steve Jobs in 1976, Apple has pushed its revenue beyond the economic outputs of Portugal, New Zealand and other countries. Along the way, it has changed how consumers connect with one another and how businesses conduct daily commerce.

Apple’s stock market value is greater than the combined capitalization of Exxon Mobil, Procter & Gamble and AT&T. It now accounts for four per cent of the S&P 500.

Stock surge

The Silicon Valley stalwart’s stock has surged more than 50,000 per cent since its 1980 initial public offering, dwarfing the S&P 500’s approximately 2,000-per cent increase during the same almost four decades.

One of three founders, Jobs was driven out of Apple in the mid-1980s, only to return a decade later and rescue the computer company from near bankruptcy.

He launched the iPhone in 2007, dropping “Computer” from Apple’s name and super-charging the cellphone industry, catching Microsoft Corp, Intel Corp, Samsung Electronics and Nokia off guard. That put Apple on a path to overtake Exxon Mobil in 2011 as the largest U.S. company by market value.

During that time, Apple evolved from selling Mac personal computers to becoming an architect of the mobile revolution with a cult-like following.

Jobs, who died in 2011, was succeeded as chief executive by Tim Cook, who has doubled the company’s profits but struggled to develop a new product to replicate the society-altering success of the iPhone, which has seen sales taper off in recent years.

In 2006, the year before the iPhone launch, Apple generated less than $20 billion US in sales and net profit just shy of $2 billion US. By last year, its sales had grown more than 11-fold to $229 billion US – the fourth highest in the S&P 500 – and net income had mushroomed at twice that rate to $48.4 billion US , making it the most profitable publicly-listed U.S. company.

One more thing…

Jeff Carbone, co-founder of Cornerstone Financial Partners in Charlotte, N.C., has included Apple in his clients’ portfolios for about a decade. Recently, some of his older clients have bought Apple shares for their grandchildren.

“We still see upside from it, and as new money gets deposited we continue to buy, preferably on the dip,” Carbone said.

Apple’s stock has risen over 30 per cent in the past year, fueled by optimism about the iPhone X, launched a decade after the original. Also propelling Apple higher in recent months was Apple’s announcement that it earmarked $100 billion US for a new share repurchase program.

In its report on Tuesday, Apple sales led by the iPhone X, which sells for about $1,000 US, or $1,300 in Canada, pushed quarterly results far beyond Wall Street targets, with subscriptions from App Store, Apple Music and iCloud services bolstering business.

“The markets are starting to recognize the value of its platform and services more and more, and that’s what is being reflected in the increase in market capitalization,” said Brad Neuman, Director of Market Strategy at Alger, a growth equity asset management firm in New York City.

Even with its $1,000,000,000,000 US stock market value, many analysts do not view Apple’s shares as expensive. Shares of Apple this week traded at about 15 times expected earnings, compared to Amazon at 82 times earnings and Microsoft at 25 times earnings.

Adjusting for four stock splits over the years, Apple debuted on the stock market for the equivalent of 39 cents a share on Dec. 12, 1980, compared to Thursday’s high of $208.38 US.

In 2015, Apple joined the Dow Jones Industrial Average, one of capitalism’s most exclusive clubs. Since 1980, IBM, Exxon Mobil, General Electric and Microsoft have also alternated as the largest publicly listed U.S. company.

In 2007, Chinese government-controlled PetroChina briefly reached a stock market value of about $1.1 trillion following its public listing in Shanghai. It is now worth about $200 billion, according to Thomson Reuters data.

One of five U.S. companies since the 1980s to take a turn as Wall Street’s largest company by market capitalization, Apple could lose its lead to the likes of Alphabet Inc. or Amazon.com Inc. if it does not find a major new product or service as global demand for smartphones loses steam.

Hot on Apple’s heels is Amazon.com, the second-largest listed U.S. company by market value, at around $880 billion, closely followed by Google-owner Alphabet and by Microsoft.

Source :

CBC

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*


16 − ten =